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Here are some examples: 

  • $2 per pay period gives 10 hours of tutoring to 1 child
  • $3 per pay period covers cancer screenings for 5 adults
  • $5 per pay period means school supplies for 25 children
  • $10 per pay period provides 1 week of emergency shelter for a woman seeking safety
  • $20 per pay period provides 1 child with safe, quality afterschool and summer care
  • $30 per pay period keeps a family in safe housing for 3 months

Project 44 - The 2018-2019 SECC Charity Of Choice

Launched in 2016, Project 44 was created in honor of the late Andrew Smith. Wearing the #44, Andrew was a beloved, standout member of Butler’s two-time NCAA Finals basketball team. Having been a personal recipient of a bone marrow transplant in November of 2015, Andrew and his wife Samantha were blessed with an additional three months together to make and share memories that would last well beyond Andrew’s final days on earth. On January 12, 2016, at the age of 25, Andrew passed away following a two-year battle with cancer.

Committed to carrying out Andrew’s selfless work, Project 44’s initial goal is to save 44 lives. With a 1:430 ratio of registrants to matches, 18,920 new registry members are needed. Now an incorporated 501(c)3 non-profit organization, Project 44’s enhanced broader mission is to save lives by fostering a mainstream sense of moral obligation and willingness to support and join the bone marrow registry.

For more information, visit http://www.rileykids.org/about/camp-riley/.

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ICAN

Mission – ICAN trains and places assistance dogs with individuals with disabilities and provides foundational life skills to inmates through their experiences as trainers.

ICAN brings together three diverse groups to empower people to live more enriched and independent lives:

  1. Children and adults living with disabilities
  2. Carefully screened incarcerated adults
  3. The compassionate canine

ICAN is the only accredited service dog organization in Indiana and currently have training programs in three state correctional facilities – Indiana Women’s Prison, Pendleton Correctional Facility and Correctional Industrial Facility. Approximately, 70% of their income comes from individual contributions and grants.

Food Bank of Northwest Indiana

The Food Bank of NWI is leading the fight against hunger in northwest Indiana by acquiring and distributing more than 4.3 million meals annually. They work with partner agencies, including food pantries, soup kitchens, shelters, and day care centers to serve more than 145,000 households each year in Lake and Porter Counties.

Hunger relief programs like BackPack, CSFP (Senior-focused hunger relief), Summer Food Assistance Program, and Pantry on the Go are a life-line to men, women, and children throughout the region.

For more information go to: http://foodbanknwi.org/.

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Since 1945, Little Red Door has been striving to help the medically underserved of Central Indiana make the most of life and the least of cancer. Little Red Door provides services such as transportation to treatment, nutritional supplements, durable medical goods, wigs, breast prosthesis, complementary therapies, preventative education, nutrition demonstrations, and 3 different camps for children who have been diagnosed with cancer.

A donation of $25 can provide one care package or wig to someone in need, $50 will provide one patient with a week’s worth transportation to cancer treatment, $100 will provide one patient with a month of life-saving nutritional supplements, and $150 will provide one patient with a month of complementary therapies such as fitness classes, nutritional demos, massage therapy, and psychosocial programming.

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Girls Inc. of Greater Indianapolis

The mission of Girls Inc. is to inspire girls to be strong, smart, and bold.

Today’s girls have it tough. In greater Indianapolis alone:

  • Girls are just as likely as boys to enjoy science class but half as likely to pursue science careers.
  • 38% of girls think they’re overweight. Medically, only 10% are.
  • One third of girls (in 6th to 10th grades) are victims of bullying.
    Increasingly, bullying is online or via text.
  • 40% of girls think speaking in class is a threat to their emotional safety.

Since 1969, Girls Inc. of Greater Indianapolis has set out to reverse these disturbing trends and promote a community that’s positive and empowering for girls.

The programs offered work to free girls from gender stereotypes, truly allowing them to be themselves. Girls Inc. empowers girls to be confident in their own skin, prepared for their futures, proud of who they are, and ready to take their place in the world. By partnering with schools and community organizations, Girls Inc. offers educational and empowering programs to girls at their facilities.

Girls Inc. provides guides and tips for girl advocates in a number of key areas including bullying and cyber-bullying, body image, and narrowing the “STEM Gap”. The acronym STEM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math; fields in which women are underrepresented. Girls Inc. provides tips on how parents and role models can encourage girls to explore their interests in STEM fields.

For more information visit: http://girlsincindy.org.